Archive for the ‘Butterflies’ Category

The colorful life of butterfly

Watching a butterfly visit a flower is always fascinating. The color of the butterfly and the flower are always in contrast. The black-and-white Common clubtail (Pachliopta coon) visiting the white flowers of Siam weed (Chromolaena odorata), or the Tailed jay (Graphium agamemnon) visiting the Lantana flower are all illustrating the importance of patterns and colors in butterfly life. And all of them are able to absorb important information from the environment such as finding potential mate, detecting flowers with high-concentrated nectar, or finding the right leaf to lay the eggs. All of because their perception of colors and movement. Continue reading

Advertisements

The man-eaters are here!

Conservationists on Friday airlifted five man-eating tigers from Aceh to the South Bukit Barisan National Park in Lampung, ending an eight-month quarantine period for the animals…. “The Jakarta Post”

How should we react when we hear that two of those tigers are going to be released when we (mistakenly) thought that the release point is about 17 km from our research camp in Way Canguk (the actual distance is about 28 km) and the tiger is definitely has at least 17 km2 home range? Continue reading

Buitenzorg, ‘beyond cares’ of a ‘botanical island’

Buitenzorg was the previous name of the Bogor Botanical Garden, a plant conservation garden marked by the large buttresses of Canarium tree close to the gate. Established in 1817 by Prof. Dr. C. G. L. Reindwardt in collaboration with Kew Garden in England, this 87 hectares botanical garden becomes the leading natural plant preservation site in Indonesia and one of the most picnic destinations for many families. That was why I prefer to visit here during weekdays this summer.

Continue reading

Depok, the home of peri-urban butterflies

June is the perfect month of the year. The rainy season is over and spending some time in the morning outside is pretty much rewarding. Depok, my hometown, is in the outskirt of Jakarta, a transitional urban to rural area. Jakarta which just celebrated its 479th anniversary (on 22 June) has long history of development since the Dutch colonization. An 1811’s published book, “the Island of Java” by J.J. Stockdale explained the current situation of Jakarta (previously named Batavia) during those times. At present, the urban areas of Jakarta have been greatly expanded, making the original inhabitants of Batavia, the Betawi is following the movement of peri-urban areas, such as the growing town of Depok.

Picture 1. The map of Jakarta.  Depok is the shaded area in the South
Continue reading

A palm that save our boring day….

Working in the remote forest sometimes takes me and my friend to the lack of excitement, facing the same difficult transects to the same menu of food everyday.

One day, in the Lambusango forest of Buton, in Southeast Sulawesi, we came up with a new dish, ‘arem-arem’ or stuffed rice rolls. The recipe itself is not a problem. You just need to cook rice with coconut milk and stuffed with ground beef or vegetables, wrapped it individually and then steam it (check this recipe). Normally, this recipe needs banana leaf to wrap the stuffed rice but of course banana plants are impossible to find in a primary forest. It’s a cultivated plant. So, what did we do?

Continue reading

For Lycaenidae, size doesn’t matter

These little butterflies have never really put into my attention. Only two words to apply, ‘too small’. Lycaenidae, a family of the smallest butterflies, is so diverse with about 6000 species in the world. Despite the diversity, I feel a bit strange about this family. Continue reading

The “autumn leaves” in tropical garden

I was standing in a nice garden full of flowers and trees. There is no four different seasons in this humid and hot climate place. But I watched many ‘autumn leaves’ flying gracefully from one flower to another. These are the ‘autumn leaves’ butterflies (Doleschallia polibete) that first captivated me at the end of wet and rainy season last April.

Continue reading